Paths at Amusement Parks

Paths at Amusement Parks

Introduction

When you visit an amusement park, you’re always walking on this aspect of the landscape. It is something you find everywhere you go in the park. The aspect of landscaping we are looking at this week on Art of Amusement Parks are the walking paths found at amusement parks. The amusement parks of discussion will be Canada’s Wonderland and Kings Island.

A view of Medieval Faire with the grey brick path.
A view of Medieval Faire with the grey brick path.

A Special Feeling

Although walking paths are the most walked on component at amusement parks, they are in fact a part of the landscape. They tend to add to an amusement park’s ambience, giving every park a different feel. The ambience that walking paths generate is emphasized by the material used that makes up the paths. Different construction materials produce different vibes as we will discover throughout this article.

The Magic of Walking Paths

First, let us take a look at the wonderful walking paths at Canada’s Wonderland. When Canada’s Wonderland opened on May 23rd, 1981, the first-time visitors were greeted by the magical brick walking paths. These brick paths led visitors to the excitement and thrills that awaited them. Almost 36 years later, the massive collection of brick paths still lead the way to the exciting attractions that millions of visitors greatly enjoy.

A look down International Street at Canada's Wonderland once you enter the main entrance. The floral Canadian Flag and Wonder Mountain are in view.
A look down International Street at Canada’s Wonderland once you enter the main entrance.

Eye Catching Paths of Medieval Faire

As visitors venture throughout the park, they will instantly notice the different displays of the bricks found along the paths. These displays consist of different coloured bricks and interesting patterns, along with the regular grey path bricks. A great example of the brick path designs found within the path is the one that surrounds the Medieval Faire fountain. Thick strands of dark greyish-coloured bricks branch out from the fountain, giving the surrounding path a sun-ray type look.

Here is an aerial view of the brick walkway paths surrounding the Medieval Faire fountain.
Here is an aerial view of the brick path surrounding the Medieval Faire fountain.
Map data: Google

A Thrilling View

Another decorative brick path display is in sight nearby Drop Tower,  also within Medieval Faire. Nearby Drop Tower, visitors notice the large checkered squares that are prominently featured, only adding to the excitement of what’s yet to come for those who experience the thrills of Drop Tower. The checkered brick path is highly noticeable for passengers riding Drop Tower as they descend towards the ground, coming to a fast and safe stop.

Colourfulness of the Path Bricks

As for the coloured bricks display, this can be found nearby the Coasters diner in Action Zone. The pinkish-red bricks welcome visitors into Coasters diner and creates a great visual display for those walking by. The pinkish-red bricks don’t only just stop in front of Coasters. The bricks continue their way up the path towards Slingshot and Windseeker, creating a somewhat swirling design. When you venture back towards International Street through Action Zone, you will come across the giant globe. Surrounding the giant globe is a ring of pinkish-red bricks that complements the roundness of the globe. The globe has been a prominent feature at Canada’s Wonderland since opening day back in 1981.

Coasters diner at Canada's Wonderland on a warm September day. Coasters Diner is a bright blue with pink trim.
Coasters diner at Canada’s Wonderland on a warm September day.

Emphasizing the Smallest of  Thrills

In another section of the park at Canada’s Wonderland, that being Planet Snoopy, the paths display light-brown bricks. The slightly brown coloured bricks surprisingly complement the surrounding landscape within Planet Snoopy, as well as emphasize the thrills and excitement generated by the youngest of visitors. Not only do the path bricks found throughout the park enhance and compliment the surrounding landscape, they also help flow and drain rain water that would otherwise pool and flood asphalt paths.

Ghoster Coaster in Planet Snoopy at Canada's Wonderland. The brown path leads the youngest thrill seekers and the young at heart to this fun small wooden coaster. The Ghoster Coaster sign is purple and yellow.
Ghoster Coaster in Planet Snoopy at Canada’s Wonderland. The brown path leads the youngest thrill seekers and the young at heart to this fun small wooden coaster.

Splashing Fun Paths

Throughout the rest of Canada’s Wonderland, particularly in Splash Works, visitors will come across large concrete tiles. These large concrete tiles lead visitors to the slides and other water attractions.  These concrete tile paths tend to keep visitors’ feet cool from the glaring sun, while keeping visitors from slipping on the potentially wet paths as visitors venture from one slide to the next. The large concrete tiles spread throughout Splash Works somewhat gives visitors the impression as if they’re walking along a large pool deck. Now that we have looked at the various attractive path designs at Canada’s Wonderland, we are now going to take a look at the equally attractive paths at Kings Island.

Splash Works on a bustling warm day. There are water slides in the background.
Splash Works on a bustling warm day.

Paths of Kings Island

There are many path materials to be found throughout Kings Island. You will notice this as you begin to travel throughout the park. The various path materials consist of bricks, asphalt, and concrete. Once entering through the front entrance, visitors instantly see the nicely placed bricks that are laid out on International Street. As visitors venture towards the Eiffel Tower, located at the end of the Royal Fountains, they will begin to walk on asphalt. Typically, visitors often frown upon asphalt at amusement parks as it collects the heat from the sun. But, at Kings Island it is used effectively nearby the Eiffel Tower.

Nostalgia of Asphalt Paths

The asphalt surrounding the Eiffel Tower produces a vibe of an older amusement park that creates a certain kind of nostalgia of long ago. Visitors can greatly experience the nostalgia of yesteryear as they stroll along the asphalt path nearby the Grand Carousel. This asphalt has large shade bearing trees which helps add to the nostalgic experience.

The Grand Carousel at Kings Island in the evening with a shade over casting the asphalt walking paths. The Grand Carousel building it a creamy white with red trim.
The Grand Carousel at Kings Island in the evening with a shade over casting the asphalt path.

The Asphalt Paths of the Eiffel Tower

The asphalt paths located nearby the Eiffel Tower then spread out to the rest of the park. If you venture off to the left (east) of the Eiffel Tower, you will enter into Octoberfest and Coney Mall. These two sections are effectively and attractively laid with brick paths combining with the beautiful landscape. These brick paths also generate the feeling of an old style amusement park. This is true, especially once combined with the vintage rides, the large maple trees, and patios set up along the paths. The nostalgic sensation of Coney Mall generated by the brick paths also comes to life at night as the lamp posts and ride lights illuminate throughout the section. This makes visitors to feel as if they’ve stepped back in time.

A look down onto Coney Mall from the Eiffel Tower at Kings Island. There is a large white coloured wooden roller coaster to the left of the photo.
A look down onto Coney Mall from the Eiffel Tower at Kings Island.

Concrete Paths of Action Zone

When visitors venture north from Coney Mall, passing through Oktoberfest, they will arrive in Action Zone. Action Zone at Kings Island is home to many dynamic and thrilling rides. Action Zone is also home to the land of the concrete paths. There is indeed a benefit to concrete paths. In fact, the use of concrete paths greatly reduce the heat stress that visitors experience on paths made of asphalt.

Shade Amongst the Paths of Action Zone

Visitors at Kings Island will also notice the large shade space that was attractively constructed central of the concrete paths within Action Zone. This shade zone does not only keeps visitors cool from the hot Ohio summers, but is a part of the landscape at Kings Island. Large yellow and white triangular canopies cover the shade zone, shrubs surround the area which perfectly compliment the concrete paths, in turn beautifying the area.

A View of Action Zone ta Kings Island from the Eiffel Tower. If you look closely, you can see the shade zone in the center of the concrete pathway. The shade zone has yellow and white canopies.
A View of Action Zone ta Kings Island from the Eiffel Tower. If you look closely, you can see the shade zone in the center of the concrete pathway.

Paths Leading Into the Waters

If we make our way over to the far side of Kings Island, we will come to Soak City, Kings Island’s water park. Just like Splash Works at Canada’s Wonderland, Kings Island’s Soak City has paths laid with concrete tiles. The use of the concrete tiles throughout Soak City truly adds to the landscaping efforts found throughout Soak City. The concrete paths also cause visitors to feel as if they’re a part of a gigantic surf or beach party. This is a true effect especially since the paths lead into the lazy river and the two large wave pools that are some of the many attractions that cool visitors.

The Tropical Twister slides in Soak City at Kings Island. The concrete path can be seen to the right of the slides. The slides are painted blue.
The Tropical Twister slides in Soak City at Kings Island. The concrete path can be seen to the right of the slides.

Conclusion

As you have just discovered,  walking paths are more than just paths. They indeed add to the landscape at amusement parks. Also, different materials create a certain feeling or vibe that enhances the overall experience for visitors. The next time you step into an amusement park, look at how the paths enhance the landscaping efforts. Next time, we will be looking at the artificial landscaping features at amusement parks! Until next time, be sure to take a look at the landscaping features at Canada’s Wonderland during its early years thanks to Vintage Toronto via Facebook!

Landscaping Throughout the Seasons at Amusement Parks

Landscaping Throughout the Seasons at Amusement Parks

Introduction

This week on Art of Amusement Parks, we are going to take a look at landscaping throughout the seasons at amusement parks. The park in discussion this week will be Canada’s Wonderland.

 

The Seasons of Change

As we know, there are four distinct seasons in North America in some of the Northern and Western hemispheres. These seasons consist of Spring, Summer, Fall, and Winter. To some amusement park enthusiasts, there are only two seasons. Those seasons are roller coaster riding season and the off-season (when the park is closed)! Joking aside, the landscape at amusement parks truly transforms in front of visitors’ eyes as the seasons change. First, let us take a look at the season of Spring, the time of year amusement parks come alive.

Here is a view of International Street at Canada's Wonderland. Purple, yellow, and red flowers take place of the floral Canadian flag in the early May seasons.
Early in the season, the Floral Canadian flag hasn’t arrived yet. In place are some beautiful annuals.

Springtime at Canada’s Wonderland

Preseason events begin by starting off with bank days and media days.  The operations of the rides do not only indicate that Spring is here! The vegetation found throughout the landscape at Canada’s Wonderland does as well. If you have ever entered the park prior to late May or early June, you will notice a difference. The major difference you will incur is that the iconic Canadian flag floral arrangement is not there. In its place is a beautiful arrangement of various annuals that stays until the arrival of the Canadian Flag in late May.

A view of an empty International Street at Canada's Wonderland on a day in June. The path consists of brown bricks and the floral Canadian flag is in the background. The Canadian Flag is red and white with a maple leaf in the center.
A view of an empty International Street at Canada’s Wonderland on a day in June.

Budding of the Trees

As we venture throughout Canada’s Wonderland in the Spring, you will come to notice the lack of shade. You may also notice how easy it is to see across the park. Although there are some coniferous trees such as spruce and pine throughout the park. At this time of the year, the deciduous trees are only starting to bud. This allows for the park’s landscape to appear and feel somewhat empty, while retaining its true beauty. Visitors can experience the view as they walk around the park and catch a few rides in the warm and fresh Spring air. The lack of leaves on the trees also allows for some quite interesting shots. These shots would not be able to be captured other times of the year.

Here is a view of the Vortex roller coaster early in the season at Canada's Wonderland. The trees have no leaves on them as it is Springtime. Vortex is a red roller coaster where the cars hang beneath the track.
As the trees are budding and creating leaves, Vortex can easily be seen from along the White Water Canyon to Action Zone path.

 

A Summer of Fun

As Canada’s Wonderland approaches the month of June, the trees begin to fill in and create shade. The floral Canadian Flag at the front of International Street makes an appearance for another season. Prior to the Summer season, the work of the grounds maintenance and landscaping teams at Canada’s Wonderland kicks into high gear.

Effectiveness of the Landscapers

Many floral arrangements throughout the park are quickly installed. These floral arrangements can delight the hundreds of thousands of visitors as they are attractively placed alongside queue lines, walking paths, and even some of the park’s most thrilling attractions! The summer months truly display the beauty of Canada’s Wonderland. As we venture into Summer, the crowds along with the hot temperatures begin to arrive. These hot temperatures can sometimes wreak havoc on flowers, shrubs, and trees. But, the landscaping team at Canada’s Wonderland has been able to perfect the art of keeping some of the most important landscaping features alive during these usually boiling months.

The flowers in the flowerbed in Action Zone keep their beauty in the sweltering heat of the summer. The flowers are purple and red in colour.
The flowers in the flowerbed in Action Zone keep their beauty in the sweltering heat of the summer.

 

The End of Summer and the Terror to Follow

Once the summer begins to wind down in late August, the school children are about to return back to classes.  There’s a hint of landscaping change that is about to come.  This change of the landscape makes Canada’s Wonderland extremely popular during the Fall months, especially on weekend nights. Before we get to that frightening time of the season, let us look at the hint as to what’s to come.

 

The Terrorizing Transformation Begins

In late August, Canada’s Wonderland begins to announce that the most chilling part of the season is to come. With this announcement comes the installation of the Halloween Haunt house at the front of the park on International Street. The Halloween Haunt house displays as to what visitors should expect when they venture to the park on those cool October weekend nights. Also in late August and early September, the Halloween Haunt hearse rolls into town, attracting the attention of many park visitors. This is only the beginning on the landscaping transformation that the park experiences in the Fall season.

Here is a view of the Halloween Haunt haunted house display on International Street at Canada's Wonderland. The house is purple surround by a green fence.
A sneak peek as to what is yet to come later in the season.

 

Spook-tacular Landscaping

Once late September rolls around, so does the extensive landscaping and theming of Canada’s Wonderland’s Halloween Haunt. For the remainder of the season, Canada’s Wonderland’s landscape is transformed into possibly the most terrifying landscape visitors’ can experience. Prior to the start of Halloween Haunt, Whitewater Canyon is closed down for the season and transforms into the terrifying maze of Corn Stalkers.

The entrance to Medieval Faire is all covered up with netting and skeletons. The netting is brown and the entrance is a castle.
The entrance to Medieval Faire is all covered up with netting and skeletons.
A skeleton taking a sip of wine from a staircase on International Street. The skeleton is holding a green bottle.
A skeleton taking a sip of wine from a staircase on International Street.

 

Halloween Haunt Landscape

Once October hits the rest of the park, ghoulish and spine-tingling creatures begin to appear throughout the park. These horrifying creatures are found hanging from lamp posts, lurking in the bushes and flowerbeds, as well as the ponds and streams around the park. Other mazes and attractions also appear around the park, waiting for those daring to step inside on cold weekend nights in October. Where the floral Canadian flag sits is where the major Halloween haunt display sits. It transforms into a haunting graveyard filled with an abundance of blood-drooling demons, mauled bodies, and spiders larger than life! This spook-tacular display sure gets visitors into the mood for Halloween during the day and at night.

Here is the horrid looking but, friendly ogre that resides in the stream nearby the entrance to Medieval Faire during Halloween Haunt. The orge is wearing brown baggy clothes and has huge hands.
Here is the horrid looking but, friendly ogre that resides in the stream nearby the entrance to Medieval Faire during Halloween Haunt.
One of the many ghouls that lurk over visitors in the Fall at Canada's Wonderland. The ghoul is wearing all black and has red blood from the mouth.
One of the many ghouls that lurk over visitors in the Fall at Canada’s Wonderland.
The Halloween Haunt graveyard is set up where the floral Canadian flag usually resides. The sky is blue and the willow trees have a slight yellow tinge to them.
The Halloween Haunt graveyard is set up where the floral Canadian flag usually resides.
A closer look at the graveyard on International Street at Canada's Wonderland. There are a couple of demons and ghouls crawling towards the camera.
A closer look at the graveyard on International Street at Canada’s Wonderland.
Another graveyard is set up within the Action Zone section of the park for Halloween Haunt nearby Time Warp. There is a large alter with a huge grave stone in front of it.
Another graveyard is set up within the Action Zone section of the park for Halloween Haunt nearby Time Warp.

Daytime Fall Beauty

Aside from the extreme horrors and scares that visitors can experience during the months of late September and October, there is a less scary side to the landscape at Canada’s Wonderland. As the temperature becomes cool and crisp, the colours of the leaves on the trees begin to transform. The tree leaves make way to a dazzling display of shades consisting of reds and yellows. This transformation of the trees creates for some picture perfect opportunities as visitors roam the park.

A panorama view looking from the Action Zone and White Water path in front of Splash Works. Some of the tree leaves have began to turn brown.
A panorama view looking from the Action Zone and White Water path in front of Splash Works.

Festive Fun for the Young Ones

There is another less terrifying experience for the younger visitors of Canada’s Wonderland during the month of October. Planet Snoopy and Kidzville transform into Camp Spooky. Changing the landscape of these sections reflects the festivities of the season. Camp Spooky excites the youngest of visitors as the landscape features children-friendly Halloween decorations found throughout the two sections of the park. Camp Spooky is only a daytime attraction for visitors during weekends of October.

 

The End of A Season

Finally, once Halloween Haunt finishes horrifying visitors for the season in late October, the dismantling of the horrifying scenery occurs. This marks the end of a season at Canada’s Wonderland. Throughout the Winter, the park sits idle bracing the cold and snow, while park staff and executives prepare for another season of thrills and excitement. I hope you enjoyed looking at the landscaping throughout the seasons at amusement parks, in particular at Canada’s Wonderland! Next week, we are going to look at the paths at amusement parks! This sure will be a landscaping feature you do not want to miss! Until next time, be sure to check out CoasterCircuits’ video below of what fun there you can have at Canada’s Wonderland in October!

 

Usage of Trees at Amusement Parks

Usage of Trees at Amusement Parks

Introduction

This week on Art of Amusement Parks, we are going to look at the usage of trees at amusement parks. The amusement parks of discussion this week will be Canada’s Wonderland, Dorney Park, and Kings Island.

Here is a view of the trees located within Action Zone at Canada's Wonderland in October. The three trees have red leaves and the sky is blue with white fluffy clouds.
Trees located beside Orbiter in Action Zone on a nice warm October day.

While spending a day at the amusement park, you may seek refuge from the heat of the sun under a tree, keeping cool in its shade. There is more to trees than just a source of shade as they are found among the landscape. Interestingly enough, the usage of trees can significantly give an amusement park a certain kind of aspect. This certain aspect cannot be experienced at amusement parks lacking trees.. In the following paragraphs we will discuss those specific aspects that trees produce. Let us first take a look at the “outback” sections that Canada’s Wonderland and Kings Island have to offer.

 

The Forests of the Parks

As visitors venture towards the back of the parks, they will come across a forest-like section. White Water Canyon at Canada’s Wonderland and Rivertown at Kings Island offer the aspect of seclusion unlike any other sections at the parks. Many thrilling rides and attractions are home to these sections. The signature attraction that operates at both parks is the White Water Canyon river rapids ride. First, we will take a look at the usage of trees in the White Water Canyon section at Canada’s Wonderland.

White Water Canyon at Canada’s Wonderland

The White Water Canyon section at Canada’s Wonderland debuted in 1984. Interestingly enough, a ride of the same name is the star attraction of the section. The White Water Canyon is a river rapids ride manufactured by Intamin of Switzerland. It consists of a long concrete channel and rafts that meander throughout the forest-like section. As passengers ride White Water Canyon, they may feel as if they’re actually traveling along a roaring river. The bush of trees that surrounds White Water Canyon is quite dense, often obstructing the view of the park.

Here is a view of some visitors navigating down White Water Canyon's water channel in a six passenger raft. The water channel is surrounded by green trees.
Here are some visitors navigating down the water channel of White Water Canyon.

The White Water Canyon section at Canada’s Wonderland is also home to another water ride known as Timberwolf Falls. It was manufactured by Hopkins and has been drenching riders since 1989. Timberwolf Falls is also semi-secluded from the rest of the park due to the great amount of trees. Visitors can also feel a sense of isolation as they eat at the Roadside Chicken eatery or walk along the path between Action Zone and White Water Canyon. The trees within White Water Canyon also complement the buildings that have a rustic look and design. You will come to discover that Rivertown at Kings Island has the same sense of seclusion and old time charm.

 

Rivertown at Kings Island

The Rivertown section at Kings Island has been a somewhat prominent section of the park since opening year in 1972. Rivertown replicates the look of an old logging town. This is evident as the buildings and other theming within the section reflect that of a bygone era. The Rivertown section offers seclusion by many trees that have been there for years. The Rivertown section has been home to the KI and Miami Valley Railroad since opening day.

Here is a view of the KI and Miami Valley Railroad's green steam locomotive pulling into the Rivertown Station at Kings Island. The station is densely surrounded by green trees and foliage.
The KI and Miami Valley Railroad green locomotive pulling into the Rivertown station at Kings Island.

The KI and Miami Valley Railroad is miniature railroad that features two steam locomotives. It has been taking passengers throughout the forested area of Rivertown now for 45 years. Along the forested track, visitors can view the remnants of a western village. They can also view Fort Coney, that was built long before the park existed. Originally, the KI and Miami Valley Railroad traveled a loop only making one stop in the Rivertown section. Since the introduction of the Soak City water park in 1989, the train has been making stops to pick up and drop off passengers there as well.

Here is a view from the green train on the KI and Miami Valley Railroad at Kings Island. The train is surrounded by many trees and foliage which is green.
An on-ride view looking into the forest of Rivertown at Kings Island.

 

Increasing Popularity of Rivertown

Interestingly enough, it was not until 1979 that Rivertown had become a very popular section of the park, due to one particular attraction. In April of 1979, The Beast was introduced. It sends riders into terror as they travel along the 7,359 feet of wooden track throughout the forested Rivertown section. The Beast was regarded as the World’s longest wooden coaster when it opened, and still claims this title to this day.

While riding The Beast, one may come to forget that they are at Kings Island due to the forested nature of the back section of the park. Passengers may only notice the rest of the park once they crest the second lift hill before plummeting into the double helix prior to returning to the station. Six years after the introduction of The Beast, White Water Canyon debuted in 1985. The White Water Canyon is a river rapids ride very similar to the one found at Canada’s Wonderland. Many trees surround the ride, giving passengers a sense of seclusion.

Here is John Brooks standing in front of The Beast's sign at Kings Island. The ground is laid with brown cobblestone brick with a wooden mesh fence behind.
Here I am in front of The Beast at Kings Island after taking a thrilling ride on it.

The Rest of Rivertown

As we continue our way through Rivertown, there is an original log flume ride that has been splashing riders prior to Kings Island’s grand opening in 1972. The Race for Your Life Charlie Brown log flume sits on the edge of Rivertown. It had previously operated at Coney Island in Cincinnati prior to opening at Kings Island. The Race for Your Life Charlie Brown log flume features a water channel that sits above the ground as the log-shaped boats roam along, eventually leading to a splashdown finale.  Trees also densely surround the log flume, just like the rest of the rides and attractions in Rivertown, giving it a secluded feel.

It is important to note before we move on that Rivertown was previously home to the Kenton Cove rowing boats and the Kenton Cove Keelboat Canal log flume. Both of these attractions were heavily surrounded by the landscape of trees as well.

 

In 2009, another major attraction opened known as Diamondback. The Diamondback is a hyper roller coaster manufactured by Bolliger and Mabillard. It features a 230 foot tall lift hill. After passengers descend down the 230 foot hill, they maneuver through Rivertown at speeds up to 80 mph (128 km/h). Diamondback’s lift hill is one of the only parts of the coaster that sticks out high above the surrounding tree line. Surprisingly, another coaster will be calling Rivertown home this spring. Mystic Timbers is a wooden coaster that situates itself among the trees in Rivertown, thrilling all those who take a ride. Now, let us take a look at an amusement park that is home to a mecca of trees in Pennsylvania.

Here is a view of Diamondback as seen from the KI and Miami Valley Railroad at Kings Island. The Diamondback has red track and brown supports.
A view of Diamondback as seen from the red train on the KI and Miami Valley Railroad at Kings Island.

 

The Amusement Park of Allentown

Dorney Park is an amusement park operating in Allentown, Pennsylvania that opened in 1884. As visitors arrive to Dorney Park for the day, they will come to notice the limited view of the rides and attractions from afar. The amount of hills in and around the park also affects the view of the rides. Despite the trees affecting the view looking in, you will immediately become immersed by the beauty of the trees once you enter the park.

Here is a view of the roller coasters at Dorney Park standing tall above the surrounding trees.
The roller coasters of Dorney Park peeking out above the trees on this nice summer’s day.
Here is a view of Dominator at Dorney Park standing tall above the trees. Dominator is a tall white tower ride that shoots passengers safely into the air.
Dominator at Dorney Park standing tall above the surrounding trees. Steel Force is in the background. Demon Drop is the aqua blue tower next to Dominator.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The only truly themed section of the park is the children’s section, Planet Snoopy. The rest of the park, including Wild Water Kingdom, the park’s water park is quite generic but, also quite unique in its own way. The uniqueness at Dorney Park is created by the amount of trees spread throughout the park. The tree placement at Dorney Park creates a somewhat relaxing but thrilling atmosphere all at the same time.

The Feeling of Yesteryear

In a World of modern technology, Dorney Park is able to retain the old amusement park feel of yesteryear. This is mostly in part by the great amount of trees which gives the park an antiquated and somewhat isolated impression for visitors. Not only do the trees add beauty to the park but, they also complement the rides that operate at Dorney Park. The Monster, Tilt-A-Whirl, and the Ferris Wheel are perfect examples of this. The trees really make these classic rides stand out and create for quite a thrilling experience.

 

Visitors can truly feel as if they’ve stepped back in time as they walk down the path nearby Thunderhawk, the park’s wooden roller coaster. Thunderhawk opened in 1924 making it one of the oldest operating roller coasters in the World. Trees line the path that interacts with Thunderhawk as strings of lights run along Thunderhawk’s track, making it highly attractive a night. The combination of trees and lights makes way for the ultimate vintage amusement park atmosphere.

Here is a view of one of Thunderhawk's trains climbing the lift hill in the evening. The Thunderhawk is a wooden roller coaster that is painted white.
One of Thunderhawk’s trains climbing up the lift hill on a beautiful evening in June.

Water Rides and Trees

As we venture throughout the rest of Dorney Park, you will come to notice the abundance of trees that are nearby two of the three water rides. The trees mostly hide Thunder Creek Mountain and Thunder Canyon, which are the park’s log flume and river rapids. The usage of the trees alongside these water rides creates the illusion of actually flowing down a raging river. Finally, the trees also serve as a purpose of shade for passengers riding the water rides on a hot summer’s day.

Here is a view of a yellow coloured raft on Thunder Canyon navigating the large waterfalls at Dorney Park.
A view of Thunder Canyon from the Cedar Creek Cannonball train at Dorney Park as a raft navigates the water falls and rapids.
Here is a view of the Thunder Creek Mountain log flume station platform. It is densely surrounded by green trees.
The station platform for the Thunder Creek Mountain log flume at Dorney Park.

 

 

 

 

 

Conclusion

In conclusion, the usage of trees at amusement parks plays a huge role in regards to landscaping. Trees more than just serve as a source of shade. They beautify the landscape and give amusement parks an amazing atmosphere that varies at each amusement park. I hope you enjoyed this week’s topic of the usage of trees at amusement parks! Be sure to come back next week as we’ll be looking at the landscaping throughout the seasons at amusement parks! Until next week, be sure to check out the beautiful Fall foliage of Kings Island back in November of 2002 thanks Paul Drabek via Negative G.